Congrats to Our Nominees!

Greeting Voyagers!

We have a very special announcement that we are just TOO excited to share with y’all. This past Tuesday, April 2nd, The Hugo Awards—THE award in Science Fiction and Fantasy—have announced their finalists and we are so proud to say we have a few nominees from the Voyager family!

 

Best Novel:

Becky Chambers – Record of a Spaceborn Few

 

Best Series:

Becky Chambers – Wayfarer series

 

John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer:

S.A. Chakraborty

R.F. Kuang

 

Harper Voyager is incredibly proud of the nominees and can’t wait to hear their acceptance speeches 😉. Congratulations to Becky Chambers, S. A. Charkraborty, R. F. Kuang, and to all other nominees for this tremendous accomplishment. This goes to show if you haven’t picked up a book written by these empowering sci-fi/fantasy writers… UM, WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR!?

 

See below for a list of all our current nominations (and wins!) as well as summaries of the nominee’s novels.

 

The Kitschies Awards finalists

 

The Red Tentacle (Novel)

Becky Chambers – Record of a Spaceborn Few

 

The Golden Tentacle (Debut)

R. F. Kuang – The Poppy War

 

Compton Crook Award finalists 

S. A. Chakraborty – The City of Brass

R. F. Kuang – The Poppy War

Nick Clark Windo – The Feed

 

The IAFA William L. Crawford Fantasy Award 2019 Winner

R. F. Kuang – The Poppy War

 

 

About Record of a Spaceborn Few by Becky Chambers

Hundreds of years ago, the last humans left Earth. After centuries wandering empty space, humanity was welcomed—mostly—by the species that govern the Milky Way, and their generational journey came to an end.

But this is old history. Today the Exodus Fleet is a living relic, a place many are from but few outsiders have seen. When a disaster rocks this already fragile community, those Exodans who have not yet left for alien cities struggle to find their way in an uncertain future. Among them are a mother, a young apprentice, an alien academic, a caretaker for the dead, a man searching for a place to belong, and an archivist, who ensures no one’s story is forgotten. Each has their own voice, but all seek answers to inescapable questions:

Why remain among the stars when there are habitable worlds within reach? And what is the purpose of a ship that has reached its destination?

 

you can order the book here

 

About The Poppy War by R. F. Kuang

When Rin aced the Keju—the Empire-wide test to find the most talented youth to study at the academies—it was a shock to everyone: to the test officials, who couldn’t believe a war orphan from Rooster Province could pass without cheating; to Rin’s guardians, who always thought they’d be able to marry Rin off to further their criminal enterprise; and to Rin herself, who realized she was now finally free of the servitude and despair that had made up her daily existence. That she got into Sinegard—the most elite military school in the Nikara Empire—was even more surprising.

 

But surprises aren’t always good.

 

Being a dark-skinned peasant girl from the south is not an easy thing at Sinegard. Rin is targeted from the outset by rival classmates because of her color, poverty, and gender. Driven to desperation, she discovers she possesses a lethal, unearthly power—an aptitude for the nearly mythical art of shamanism. Exploring the depths of her gift with the help of a seemingly insane teacher and psychoactive substances, Rin learns that gods long thought dead are very much alive—and that mastering control over her powers could mean more than just surviving school.

 

For even though the Nikara Empire is at peace, the Federation of Mugen still lurks across a narrow sea. The militarily advanced Federation occupied the Nikara Empire for decades after the First Poppy War, and only barely lost the continent in the Second. And while most of the people in the Empire would rather forget their painful history, a few are aware that a Third Poppy War is just a spark away.

Rin’s shamanic powers may be the only way to save her people. But as she finds out more about the god who has chosen her, the vengeful Phoenix, she fears that winning the war may cost her her humanity.

 

And it may already be too late.

 

You can order the book here

 

About City of Brass by S. A. Chakraborty

Nahri has never believed in magic. Certainly, she has power; on the streets of eighteenth-century Cairo, she’s a con woman of unsurpassed talent. But she knows better than anyone that the trades she uses to get by—palm readings, zars, and a mysterious gift for healing—are all tricks, both the means to the delightful end of swindling Ottoman nobles and a reliable way to survive.

 

But when Nahri accidentally summons Dara, an equally sly, darkly mysterious djinn warrior, to her side during one of her cons, she’s forced to reconsider her beliefs. For Dara tells Nahri an extraordinary tale: across hot, windswept sands teeming with creatures of fire and rivers where the mythical marid sleep, past ruins of once-magnificent human metropolises and mountains where the circling birds of prey are more than what they seem, lies Daevabad, the legendary city of brass—a city to which Nahri is irrevocably bound.

 

In Daevabad, within gilded brass walls laced with enchantments and behind the six gates of the six djinn tribes, old resentments run deep. And when Nahri decides to enter this world, her arrival threatens to ignite a war that has been simmering for centuries.

 

Spurning Dara’s warning of the treachery surrounding her, she embarks on a hesitant friendship with Alizayd, an idealistic prince who dreams of revolutionizing his father’s corrupt regime. All too soon, Nahri learns that true power is fierce and brutal. That magic cannot shield her from the dangerous web of court politics. That even the cleverest of schemes can have deadly consequences.

 

After all, there is a reason they say to be careful what you wish for . . .

 

You can order the book here

 

 

About The Feed by Nick Clark Windo

Set in a post-apocalyptic world as unique and vividly imagined as those of Mad Max and The Girl with All the Gifts, a startling and timely debut that explores what it is to be human and what it truly means to be connected in the digital age.

 

IT MAKES US. IT DESTROYS US. NOW WE MUST LEARN TO LIVE WITHOUT IT.

 

The Feed is accessible everywhere, by everyone, at any time. It instantaneously links us to all information and global events as they break. Every interaction, every emotion, every image can be shared through it; it is the essential tool everyone relies on to know and understand the thoughts and feelings of partners, parents, friends, children, colleagues, bosses, employees . . . in fact, of anyone and everyone else in the world.

 

Tom and Kate use the Feed, but Tom has resisted its addiction, which makes him suspect to his family. After all, his father created it. But that opposition to constant connection serves Tom and Kate well when the Feed collapses after a horrific tragedy shatters the world as they know it.

 

The Feed’s collapse, taking modern society with it, leaves people scavenging to survive. Finding food is truly a matter of life and death. Minor ailments, previously treatable, now kill. And while the collapse has demolished the trappings of the modern world, it has also eroded trust. In a world where survival of the fittest is a way of life, there is no one to depend upon except yourself . . . and maybe even that is no longer true.

 

Tom and Kate have managed to protect themselves and their family. But then their six-year-old daughter, Bea, goes missing. Who has taken her? How do you begin to look for someone in a world without technology? And what happens when you can no longer even be certain that the people you love are really who they claim to be?

 

You can order the book here

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